Misfit Tips FeatureWatercolor PalettesWatercolor Tips

Best Watercolor Palette Set Up for Me

posted by Misfit September 27, 2017

SOOOO THIS COMING WEEK IS MY BIRTHDAY – 

And I decided to be “adult” and purchase my very own porcelain watercolor palette. WHich I did and not I’m gonna show you all the ins and out of how I go about setting up my very first porcelain watercolor palette!  YEAH!    Hope your ready to get into this – cause I am…

 

STEP ONE:  CLEAN THE SURFACE

Step number one for me for any palette that I purchase – whether it’s plastic metal or porcelain – is to clean the entire surface of the palette.   Making sure to even get all the grooves and wells.   

My reasoning behind this is to remove any dust that might have collected along the grooves or wells of the palette before making it’s way to me.   Trust me from personal experience – having dust mix with your paints is not pleasant :P.   

STEP TWOLET IT DRY

Step number 2 of setting up my palette is – wiping it down after it’s water bath.   Oh, I forgot to mention – I don’t usually use soap for the first step – just plain water.   After wiping the palette down I then proceed to the funnest step – yet also most complex – sorting my paints and deciding which one’s will end up inside my latest addition to my watercolor supplies!  

STEP THREESORTING MY PAINTS

Now this particular palette as 18 deep wells and 14 shallow wells- thus a total of 32.  This is just personal preference – but for now – I’m going to choose 18 of my most used colors to place in the deep wells and leave the 14 shallow mixing area empty.  I’m thinking – I might want to use them for mixing new colors from my original 18.  But we shall see…

I then proceeded to sift through my watercolor tubes paints and hand pick the colors I use most often in my illustrations as well as some new colors which I’m planning on using in the future. 

STEP FOURWARM COOL & NEUTRALS

Step Number four – Warm Cool and Neutrals.   This step refers to how I like to group my colors.   I usually like to group my warms together then my cool colors and finally my neutrals.    I usually lay out my tubes around the palette to get an idea of how I want them set up before actually committing to a set up.  Here’s an idea of all the colors I will be using and their groupings.     

STEP FIVE:  SETTING UP MY PALETTE

And finally, I place my paints one by one into their wells.    Now let’s get into what you really want to know!  1) WHERE DID I GET THIS PALETTE and 2) WAS IT WORTH THE INVESTMENT?

>>>WHERE DID I GET THE PALETTE<<<

I will provide a link below, but I purchased this palette at Blick Art Supplies Online.   I was completely satisfied with their customer support, shipping, prices, basically the whole experience and will purchase there again.

CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT THE EXACT PALETTE I PURCHASED

>>>PROS AND CONS TO THIS PORCELAIN PALETTE<<<

Let’s look at the GOOD FIRST:

First I absolutely love how large it is!  Giving me tons of space to mix and store my paints.  I also really love the s shaped curve.  At first I thought I would like it – but wanted to give it a go.  Now, I’m in love – because it allows me to separate my colors at different ends of the curve as well as help me pool color mixtures in the tighter regions if I need more concentrated paint colors.   😀

I also love the deep wells which are larger enough to store ALOT OF PAINT!  Another reason I love the deeper wells is that it keeps the paints wet longer – thus allowing me more time to paint with each color before having to refresh it with a skirt of water.

I haven’t really used the shallower mixing areas much – but after painting with one illustration – I do see myself filling those up with my lesser used paints.   Since they are so easy to clean and wipe dry – it’s really easy to switch colors out or even mix special colors in these regions – which I’m growing to love as well!

Now for the BAD:

NO LID: For the price, I spent $60 after discounts – I really do wish it had a small lid.   This palette (due to it’s size) is heavy and meant to stay in one location pretty much forever.   So don’t plan on trucking someplace with this bad boy 😉  That being said – I really do wish it had a lid to cover the paints when not in use.   For now – I’m using plastic wrap to cover the palette – but eventually will make my own lid to fit over top.

GRIPS TOO SMALL: Another fault I found with this palette – is the small grooves on the bottom edge of the palette (meant to be used for your fingers to slip under the palette to lift it up and grip it) are WAY WAY WAY TO SMALL.   I realized this palette is meant to stay in one place – but I have to say lifting this sucker off my craft table is very difficult.   Sometimes I even have to stick a pen or pencil through the groove to just life it slightly off the table in order to get a firm grip underneath.  Also let’s just say – washing this thing was no easy feat.

Other than that, I’m really loving my porcelain palette and find it SOOOOOOO MUCH BETTER THAN ANY OF MY PLASTIC ONES.

I will say though – if price is an issue for you – make sure to check out these smaller porcelain palettes.   They will give you a taste of the finer things without blowing your budget to the moon 😉 lol  These range from $12 to $20 – although some in the Misfit community have gotten them cheaper 😀

CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT MY SMALL PORCELAIN PALETTE

Lots of love to you all and happy painting Misfitians!

CHECK OUT THESE AWESOME POSTS

8 Comments

Heather Campbell September 27, 2017 at 10:09 pm

I have a large porcelain pallet as well,I went to a craft store and bought rubber “feet” that were self adhesive now I have a gap so I can get my fingers under to move it
You can also find rubber and clear feet at hardware stores,I hope this helps
Heather

Reply
Misfit September 27, 2017 at 11:46 pm

Thanks Heather soooo much! That helps ALOT! 😀

Reply
Genevieve Gareau-Mosse October 5, 2017 at 2:20 pm

SPOOKY KITTY. I THINK IT IS SO APPROPREATE FOR OCTOBER.
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR BEGINNERS SERIES. I AM NOT AN ARTIST, HAVE NO EXPERIENCE IN WATER COLORS AND AM NOW RETIRED. I HAVE THE TIME TO EXPLORE MY INNER ARTIST.
ALSO, I REALLY LIKE YOUR TEACHING STYLE, STRUCTURED IN A WAY THAT MAKES NEWBIES LESS INTIMIDATED BY WATERCOLORS.

Reply
Misfit October 9, 2017 at 8:15 pm

Thanks Genevieve 🙂

Reply
Claire October 8, 2017 at 8:26 pm

Thanks for sharing your thought process on creating a personal palette setup. I found it very informative, and your porcelain palette is beautiful.

I noticed you use both Winsor Violet and Cotman Dioxazine Purple, I was under the impression that they were the same colour only ones artist grade and the others student grade. However, since you’ve placed them both on your palette I assume there is a bigger difference than I originally thought?
I have tried looking it up but I have only come across comparisons between the pigmentation strength.
If you have the time, I’d be very grateful if you could share your reasoning behind having them both on the same palette.
Thanks
Claire

Reply
Misfit October 9, 2017 at 8:13 pm

There actually is no difference. However, some of my students cannot afford the artist grade so I keep both in my palette and practice with both in order to help guide my students.

Reply
cindy October 11, 2017 at 6:35 pm

Hey there! Although not a permanent palette, I’ve bought a few porcelain square plates as an inexpensive option for the moment. I love how the paint moves on porcelain!

Reply
Misfit October 17, 2017 at 3:38 pm

Me too! I love how the paint flows and moves on a porcelain palette compared to plastic 😀

Reply

Leave a Comment